GOOD SEEDS in the NEWS

Good Seeds is a The Gourmand Award  national winner in its category HISTORICAL RECIPES and international finalist. It competes in its category against winners from other countries for the Best in the World. The results will be announced on May 27 & 28, 2017 at the annual Gourmand Awards Ceremony in Yantai, China.

Wisconsin Public Radio program Nov. 21, 2016, 48 min. Wild rice, maple syrup, blackberries, and partridges are among the rich cooking traditions of the Menominee, which had an open attitude toward all kinds of food. Our guest author shares his stories of what his family ate and recipes, plus discusses why he thinks society needs to value food more. http://wpr.org/shows/food-family-and-menominee-life

Midwest Connections Picks, Midwest Independent Booksellers, one of three tomgetsmiced15newsmadison8-24-16November selections, “Weso uses humor and his rare perspective as a Native anthropologist and artist to tell his story of a boy learning to thrive in a land of icy winters and summer swamps.”

Best of the Fall Cook Books, The Millers Tale July 21, 2016 Nicola Miller: “‘As Weso grew up, his uncles taught him to hunt bear, deer, squirrels, raccoons, and even skunks for the daily larder:’ These recollections are what I loved most because they are filled with love and warmth, with respect for heritage and pride. He remembers foods served at the Menominee fair and the excitement of “sugar bush,” maple sugar gatherings that included dances as well as hard work. There’s memories of wild rice harvesting in the small boats and a fascinating account of how the wild rice plants react and adapt to their location. If you are interested in agri-ecology and want to learn how we as humans can achieve a less damaging relationship with our environment, Weso’s book is for you.”

Gary Jones, Door County Peninsula Pulse, review, October 13th, 2016: Because my Wisconsin dairy farm family foraged for hickory nuts, morel mushrooms, and wild blackberries, I read with interest Thomas Pecore Weso’s new book, Good Seeds: A Menominee Indian Food Memoir. A member of the Wisconsin Menominee Nation, Weso takes readers through an indigenous culinary history of his people, every chapter devoted to a different food. Each begins by citing relevant historical text and then draws upon the author’s experiences as a youth, concluding with pertinent recipes… But while some of the recipes are relatively conventional, others seem exotic, for example, roasting porcupine, beaver tail, or bear, sometimes with barbeque sauce, or preparing milkweed, dandelion greens, or a wild rice casserole… Readers have enjoyed this informal study of a culinary culture, and appreciate the extensive bibliography included in the book.

The Reading Wolf blog: This is such a great book! I enjoyed learning about the history of the land and the tribe. I haven’t tried any of the recipes yet, but I’m sure i will soon, as they seem easy enough to follow. This book takes you on a journey and immerses you in a beautiful culture and lifestyle. So many memories and beautiful tales of growing up. You really get a feel for the author as he recounts his life and immerses you chapter by chapter into his life. This book is beautiful inside and out and I loved reading it. Thank you librarything for sending me this book in exchange for my honest review. ominee Reservation, his focus being on the things he hunted, the crops he and his relatives grew, and the berries and nuts various members of the tribe gathered. The book has a quiet tone, direct, honest, charming, and curious rather than edgy or strident. The first two chapters set the mood, with grandmother cooking downstairs while grandfather prays—or “dreams,” as Weso puts it—upstairs.  Subsequent chapters are devoted to fishing, hunting, and fruit-gathering, though there are also chapters about German beer and Wisconsin Diner food. Each chapter concludes with a few recipes.

Macaroni blog: Weso describes growing up on the Menominee Reservation, his focus being on the things he hunted, the crops he and his relatives grew, and the berries and nuts various members of the tribe gathered. The book has a quiet tone, direct, honest, charming, and curious rather than edgy or strident. The first two chapters set the mood, with grandmother cooking downstairs while grandfather prays—or “dreams,” as Weso puts it—upstairs.  Subsequent chapters are devoted to fishing, hunting, and fruit-gathering, though there are also chapters about German beer and Wisconsin Diner food. Each chapter concludes with a few recipes.

Anna Maria Polidori, Book Reviews: Every chapter Weso remembers some anecdotes of his past. It can be his beautiful moments spent in the family with his granny, it can be the hunting of the bear, or fishing, – better a big fish than not a small one, he writes at some point because the family big and so… At the end of every chapter you will find delicious recipes that you are more than invited of trying for preparing delicious meals. A chapter I loved the one of maple syrup. I adore maple syrup! I drink it with water it’s the only way I use it I confess but I love also to explore the most diversified utilization in the American culture. From Books blog!

Interview, Milwaukee Public Radio WUWM: Lake Effect with Maayan Silver Sitting down to a good meal is an experience valued across cultures. A new food memoir by Native American artist and social sciences professor Thomas Pecore Weso, called Good Seeds: A Menominee Indian Food Memoir, expands upon this shared appreciation of food to open up a window into tribal life. The memoir combines essays with accompanying recipes from Weso’s childhood growing up in the 1950s and 60s on a northern Wisconsin Menominee reservation. Weso’s food exploits include catching fish by hand and grilling and eating them within 20 minutes, smothering beaver with barbeque sauce and preparing milkweed so that it was edible. Regardless of what he was eating, Weso says it was always in season, and the source of the food was the local forests and streams. These are lessons, he says, we all need to learn. “We have to understand that we all live in a cyclical, seasonal universe… Like today if I want a pork chop, I just go down to the store and buy a pork chop,” Weso explains. “There’s little ceremony involved in that. Perhaps that lack of ceremony cheapens the value of that pork. As a society, I think we need to value our food more.” 14 Oct. 2016

 Interview, Madison Wiscosnin Public Radio WORT: Author Thomas Pecore Weso talks about his book Good Seeds: A Menominee Indian Food Memoir. His book celebrates Wisconsin’s northern woods as a source of culinary abundance and inspiration as well as a link to the author’s personal history of encounters with individuals who taught him indigenous values. Good Seeds offers authentic indigenous recipes and is also a feast for historians. 26 Sept. 2016  http://www.wortfm.org/pledge-drive-good-seeds-author-thomas-pecore-weso/ 

 Talk With Me interview, Lawrence Hits .Com, Marcia Epstein with Tom Weso, 9/10/2016

Wild Rice recipe and Corn Bread on YouTube Wild rice casserole: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=131h1Yw5otw Corn Bread: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqkCEP_a69E  And Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/whspress/

TV appearance clip, Madison, WI at NBC15 Madison about memoir, “Good Seeds.” Tom Weso reflected on how it is more than a food memoir. Discover the indigenous wild edibles that have impacted more than just the Menominee by watching the full interview, and by finding “Good Seeds” at your favorite book retailer.